Education

The Beauty of Finding Your Aha! Moment

dPoints-James-Dean-by-Shannon-Mendes

When Vancouver civil engineer James Dean started his greentech company, dPoint Technologies, in the early 2000s, he figured he could hitch his wagon to the promise of the hydrogen fuel cell sector. At the time, Burnaby, B.C.-based Ballard Technologies was leading the creation of the engine of the future—a clean, no-emission system that ran on water and hydrogen. But like many other, overly optimistic hydrogen-based fuel entrepreneurs, Dean, whose company made a specialized membrane that was to be used in the fuel-cell modules, watched the ground open beneath his feet as the commercial take-up proved to be far slower than anyone anticipated. View the Complete Article

(Read the full post here...)

ERV or HRV in Cold Climate Zones-Time to End The Debate!

There has been much discussion about whether to use an ERV or HRV in different climate zones.  Recent studies have concluded that ERVs should be used in cold dry climate zones because of improved comfort, no drain required for condensation and less energy for defrost. In the past, some manufactures have produced maps like the one below showing that HRVs should be used in cold dry climates.  Using energy modeling software and looking at the energy savings and comfort benefits, a new map of where ERV or HRVs should be used has been developed. NEW MAP   Comfort- In cold climates the outside air that is brought into the building is dry becasue cold air holds less water vapour than warm air.  When using an HRV, the humidity generated inside the building from plants and people showering and cooking is either exhausted or condensed out, leaving the building too dry.  When […]

(Read the full post here...)

Toronto FOCUS – Spring 2013

toronto_focus

SABMag publishes three regional FOCUS publications with the Canada Green Building Council chapters in Toronto, Manitoba and Alberta. As the title implies, the FOCUS publications look at the green building scene in these local areas. Click here to see the complete articles from Toronto Focus Magazine

(Read the full post here...)

Progressive Codes & Standards for Energy Recovery Ventilation

As municipalities throughout the world strive for more efficient buildings and to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gases as well as improve indoor air quality I am seeing more stringent building codes and standards related to energy recovery ventilation. Here are a few examples of some of the latest changes from progressive municipalities and organizations that we are seeing driving the adoption of Energy Recovery Ventilation. City of Vancouver As part of Vancouver’s Green Home program and goal to be the greenest city in the world by 2020 all single family homes require energy recovery ventilation and the new proposed building code will set minimum sensible energy recovery efficiency levels at 65%. Read more about the proposed codes Province of Quebec All single family residential buildings in Quebec less than 3 stories and 600m2 now require HRV/ERVs with a minimum of 54% sensible recovery efficiency at -25C and must be certified by […]

(Read the full post here...)

ASHRAE 90.1-2010

ASHRAE_Logo.svg

This standard mandates a minimum of 50% total recovery efficiency for commercial ventilation systems. It is now up to each of the states, provinces and cities to adopt the latest ASHRAE code. The US DOE mandated that by October 18, 2013, all states in the United States must put in place a commercial building energy code at least as stringent as the ASHRAE 90.1-2010 energy standard. US ASHRAE Code

(Read the full post here...)

ERV or HRV in Cold Climate Zones-Time to End The Debate!

ZoneMapSmall_BlkBrdr

There has been much discussion about whether to use an ERV or HRV in different climate zones.  Recent studies have concluded that ERVs should be used in cold dry climate zones because of improved comfort, no drain required for condensation and less energy for defrost. In the past, some manufactures have produced maps like the one below showing that HRVs should be used in cold dry climates.  Using energy modeling software and looking at the energy savings and comfort benefits, a new map of where ERV or HRVs should be used has been developed.   NEW MAP   Comfort- In cold climates the outside air that is brought into the building is dry becasue cold air holds less water vapour than warm air.  When using an HRV, the humidity generated inside the building from plants and people showering and cooking is either exhausted or condensed out, leaving the building too dry. […]

(Read the full post here...)

Progressive Codes & Standards for Energy Recovery Ventilation

Green Building Code

As municipalities throughout the world strive for more efficient buildings and to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gases as well as improve indoor air quality I am seeing more stringent building codes and standards related to energy recovery ventilation. Here are a few examples of some of the latest changes from progressive municipalities and organizations that we are seeing driving the adoption of Energy Recovery Ventilation. City of Vancouver As part of Vancouver’s Green Home program and goal to be the greenest city in the world by 2020 all single family homes require energy recovery ventilation and the new proposed building code will set minimum sensible energy recovery efficiency levels at 65%. Read more about the proposed codes Province of Quebec All single family residential buildings in Quebec less than 3 stories and 600m2 now require HRV/ERVs with a minimum of 54% sensible recovery efficiency at -25C and must be certified by […]

(Read the full post here...)